Facing Your Biggest Fear

June 3, 2013 | Jenni Proctor
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Fake it ‘til you make it!

With the help of those closest to you try to identify the things you do which indicate your lack of confidence.  It’s funny how you can consciously change your behavior and act in a way that suggests you are much more confident that you feel, and people will take that new behavior on face value. 

Pretend you feel confident!  Facing your biggest fear can be as easy as ….Walk like a confident person, speak like a confident person, smile with confidence.  Not only can this change the way other people perceive you, but it can also have a big impact on making you actually feel more confident.

Face the Demons!

Confidence is critical, but when you are experiencing problems at work it is common to temporarily misplace your belief in yourself.  Sometimes, just when you most need it, your confidence is at an all-time low. The key here is to find out the sources of these issues and rise above them.

This is not meant to be a depressing section of the book.  On the contrary, it’s a realistic look at what happens to people and what you can do to overcome the problem if it affects you.

Facing your Biggest Fear of failure

Many people thinking about changing careers naturally feel a sense of fear. No, you are not alone. If you’ve had the same job for many years making a change can be very stressful. Making a big career change which may involve undertaking study can mean an even greater level and degree of fear. Again this is not uncommon.  Fear of the unknown is natural.

 

One of the biggest fears we usually face is the fear of failure. When you start taking steps towards changing your career, some of your friends and family members may discourage you. With the best, but misguided, intentions they may reinforce the fear you are already feeling. Probably they are trying to protect you in case you don’t get the job you want. Alternatively, they think you may get a job and find that you do not have the competence and the confidence to perform well. Don’t let their concerns get you down. Make up your own mind, and be aware that change will only happen if you are prepared to step forward and take a few chances.

 

There are two things to remember here. Being afraid is a natural reaction, particularly when you are treading in unfamiliar territory, and even the most confident person has moments of doubts and fears when faced with a new challenge.

 

Problems create problems

If things are going badly at home or work it is difficult to get yourself into the positive frame of mind which supports a confident career change. 

 

If your family life is stressful, or you are engulfed in financial woes, your stress levels may worsen and you are more likely to be depressed than enthusiastic. Work stresses are often out of your control.  If your job description changes or your boss makes demands you feel unable to meet, you may feel under undue pressure.  Poor management can often contribute to employees’ dissatisfaction and stress. Stress can magnify if you have a serious disagreement with a work colleague, if your job skills are no longer enough to handle the work you are required to perform or if the culture at your workplace takes a turn for the worse.

 

Tension at work is an unhealthy situation. Your productivity will suffer.  Your health is likely to suffer. Your employer is not getting the best from you, and the cycle goes on.  Sadly, a bad work atmosphere usually only gets worse; people talk about you, or you feel that they are doing so, and everything becomes toxic.

 

People who are struggling for one reason or another will find making a career change far more difficult than those in a happy state of mind. Be kind to yourself and recognize that you may need extra help making your career change if you are not feeling on top of life!

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Last Modified: June 2, 2013
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