fbpx

What To Include In A Winning Resume

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
successful-job-search

When you write a winning resume you must be aware that you are writing it for the job you’d like to get, not just explaining your current employment.  There’s a big difference, and it can be a trap!

Write your resume to fit the job you want. Don’t just regurgitate the responsibilities of the old job.

Before you start writing anything, you need to have a strong understanding of how to make your resume stand out from the crowd to be considered a winning resume, worthy of further investigation.

A winning resume shows how well you meet their requirements.

What happens if you think you have the ability and skills to do a job, but what you do in your current position does not really tell that story? That’s a good question. Here is where some clever writing can help your application. In other words, you must tailor a winning résumé to suit the job for which you are applying.

There are three things to consider here.

  •  Your qualifications
  • Work skills and experience
  • Life experience

The first two are relevant and important to your chances of success. But let’s say they don’t give you a fantastic rating in terms of the fit for the new job? That may be where the third element comes into play.

Life Experience

Do you use relevant skills outside your employment, skills that are related to the work you for which you are applying? Have you had life experiences that contribute to you being the right person for the job? Perhaps you’ve had achievements that were not part of your work role. Including these skills, experiences and achievements can make the difference in being considered for an interview.

Do you realise that this information can be woven into your resume to illustrate your versatility and all-round capabilities?  Here are a few random examples.

Voluntary roles

If you have been involved as a volunteer the skills you have developed may be relevant.  For instance, community organisations, school parent groups, and sporting groups all offer many opportunities for leadership, communication, attention to detail and so much more.

Travel adventures

Perhaps you climbed Kilimanjaro, walked the Kokoda Trail, or sailed the Pacific Ocean.  It’s obvious that these activities all demonstrate dedication, determination, and focus that would be advantageous in a work environment.

Achievements

Have you been recognised officially for a special achievement? Have you represented your sport, your community association, or some other group? If the skills involved, or the overall experience, are relevant to the job application, then they should be included.

Parent volunteers

Don’t underestimate the skills that are required to be a parent volunteer at your children’s school or sporting club.  I know from experience that this can develop your ability to get on with difficult people, to communicate with large groups, and to be very organised.

How to include life experience in your resume

Hybrid Resume

You can create what is known as a hybrid resume.

When creating a winning resume you must make it completely related to the job for which you are applying. Firstly, don’t forget to include the usual chronological information about your career history, your roles, and your achievements.

Secondly, you could have a section where your additional experience is related to the skills or experience that they are looking for in the position description.  For example, if you have not been in a leadership position in your job, but are the secretary for the local Parents’ Association, or the coordinator for the tennis club, this demonstrates a part of you that won’t be communicated if you restrict yourself to paid employment.

In conclusion, for more information about this read How To Write A Good Resume That Grabs Attention.

Powered by WishList Member - Membership Software